Webinar
Webinar
Building the Business Valuation Body of Knowledge

Past Webinars

Aswath Damodarn, a professor of finance at the Stern School of Business at New York University, sometimes known as the ‘Dean of Valuation’,defined intangible assets to include franchises, copyrights and trademarks, patents, brand names, and invisible assets (top-notch management, loyal and well-trained workforce, and technological know-how). This webinar (a) demystifies these complex concepts by expanding the definition of intangibles and their categorization, (b) focuses on the most commonly used methods in valuing intangibles, (c) demonstrates the main methodologies used in valuing these assets, and (d) concludes with a discussion on the weaknesses of the accounting reporting model for reporting intangibles.
Lind to the Recording Webinar
What do Warren Buffett, Benjamin Graham, Charlie Munger, and Seth Klarman have in common? They are all value investors. Value investing is considered to be a strategy that involves picking stocks that appear to be trading for less than their intrinsic value. Value investors actively track down stocks they think the stock market is greatly underestimating. They do not believe in portfolio diversification; rather, they select a few excellent companies for the long-term. In this webinar, Dr. DiCicco provides a detailed analysis of value investing and how it is related to cash flow valuation. He will support his analysis with examples of successful investors.
Link to the Recoding

January 14, 2020 - The Fairness of Fair Value Accounting: Dr. Joel M. DiCicco, CPA, ICVS-A, CFF, BCA, PFS, CGMA

Since 1990, federal credit programs have been budgeted based on the requirements of the Federal Credit Reform Act (FCRA). FCRA uses a net present value approach to measure the lifetime costs of a credit commitment in the year a loan is made, where costs are measured by the difference between projected expenditures (excluding administrative costs) and projected revenues. The idea of the FCRA was to make it possible to compare credit programs with other federal spending items, which are valued on a cash expenditure basis. The fair value approach shares many similarities with FCRA accounting. Both methods use an accrual basis of accounting in that revenues and expenses are recorded when the obligations are incurred independent of when the cash is actually received or paid. Both use the same projections of future cash flows. The primary difference between the two approaches rests in the discount rate that is used to calculate the present value. While FCRA uses the risk-free rates on Treasury securities, the fair-value approach attempts to incorporate a measure of market risk by using the discount rate that a private investor would require in a well-functioning credit market

Upcoming Webinars

What do Warren Buffett, Benjamin Graham, Charlie Munger, and Seth Klarman have in common? They are all value investors. Value investing is considered to be a strategy that involves picking stocks that appear to be trading for less than their intrinsic value. Value investors actively track down stocks they think the stock market is greatly underestimating. They do not believe in portfolio diversification; rather, they select a few excellent companies for the long-term. In this webinar, Dr. DiCicco provides a detailed analysis of value investing and how it is related to cash flow valuation. He will support his analysis with examples of successful investors.
Link to the Registration Page